Nurse Practioner CME Courses

Nurse Practitioner CME Courses

Credits: 2 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video
Price: Free
Release Date: 9/29/2017
Expiration Date: 9/29/2018
Summary:

This activity is intended for pediatric oncology nurses, pediatric nurses, oncology nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse managers, infusion nurses, research nurses, physician assistants, and other health care providers who care for or have an interest in pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma

Credits: 1 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video, PDF, Online Download, Interactive Online
Price: Free
Release Date: October 19, 2017
Expiration Date: October 19, 2019
Summary:

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. While a majority of patients are diagnosed before their disease has metastasized, a fifth of patients have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Early detection and screening have been shown to significantly reduce CRC mortality, and screening is widely recommended for average-risk adults beginning at age 50 years, (as well as earlier for individuals at higher risk). Since the mid-1990s, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American Cancer Society, and other groups have recommended several modalities for screening: fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enema. Recent years have seen the addition of newer screening technologies, including stool DNA, computed tomographic colonography, and capsule endoscopy.

By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

  • Describe present the current practice guideline recommendations with respect to colorectal cancer screening, including colonoscopy preparation, and apply them to patient cases
  • Identify the treatment modalities currently available for management of mCRC and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
  • Evaluate a treatment plan for a specific patient with mCRC to optimize safety, efficacy, and tolerability, suggesting modifications for improvement
  • Describe the challenges and barriers to care associated with treating patients with mCRC
Credits: 1 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video, Interactive Online
Price: Free
Release Date: October 13, 2017
Expiration Date: October 13, 2019
Summary:

By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the epidemiology of AUD and outline current and evolving diagnostic criteria
  • Describe challenges to the successful identification of patients with AUD
  • Identify the treatment modalities currently available for management of AUD and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine
  • Develop strategies for recognizing and improving therapeutic adherence in patients treated for AUD

Alcohol use disorder (AUD), referred to colloquially as alcoholism, is an integration of past terms that have include in past as alcohol dependence or abuse, and may be marked by any one of a number of different symptoms or behaviors that include physical cravings, compulsion, guilt, and frequent consumption over an extended period of time. There are about 7.9 million people in the United States who suffer from the disease, but a fraction – 2.2 million people – seek treatment for it. The number of people who are considered heavy drinkers is about double at somewhere between 15.9 and 17.6 million, and just under a quarter of Americans over age 12 reports having engaged in binge drinking at least once in the last month. Alcohol accounts for over 687,000 emergency department visits by people under age 20 per year, and AUD is estimated to cost $223.5 billion per year. Worldwide, 76.3 million people are estimated to have AUDs, and they account for an annual mortality rate of 1.8 million. AUD is largely undertreated, constituting one gap in care and justifying CME


Credits: 1 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video
Price: Free
Release Date: March 22, 2017
Expiration Date: March 21, 2019
Summary:

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the problem of “financial harm” for individual patients
  2. List the three steps of the “First, Do No Financial Harm” framework
  3. Demonstrate strategies for discussing costs and the value of recommended medical procedures with price-sensitive patients



Credits: 1 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video, Multiple Formats
Price: Free
Release Date: Nov 1, 2017
Expiration Date: April 20, 2018
Summary:

Includes Topics in

  • HR deficiencies and BRCA mutations
  • Recurrent ovarian cancer
  • Data on available and emerging PARP inhibitors
  • Personalizing treatment selection
  • Companion Diagnostics
Credits: 1.0 (AMA PRA Category 1)
Format: Online Streaming Video
Price: Free
Release Date: September 04, 2017
Expiration Date: September 04, 2019
Summary:
This is an online CME self-learning program.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder in which joints, typically those in the hands and feet, become inflamed, swollen, painful, and stiff. Without appropriate treatment, the inflammation may become chronic and cause irreversible destruction of bone and cartilage in the affected joints as well as contribute to the development of clinically important co-morbid conditions with attendant morbidity and mortality. The National Arthritis Data Workgroup estimates that about 1.3 million U.S. adults (0.6% of the adult population) have RA. RA imposes a considerable disease burden. Patients with RA have substantially lower health-related quality of life (QOL) than the general population with lower overall scores for physical and mental health across all age groups.The RA disease burden also is associated with increased health care resource utilization. Notably, RA patients with low QOL are twice as likely to be hospitalized as RA patients with high QOL.

Some have suggested that criteria used for the past two decades are inadequate for addressing the disease burden of RA because by the time a physician detects rheumatoid nodules or radiographic erosion, the optimal time has passed for treatment initiation, representing a gap in care relating to diagnosis of disease. Another potential gap is illustrated by studies in which researchers demonstrated that a systematic, objective approach to therapy with Disease Activity Score-driven therapy yields superior outcomes to routine care.

By the end of the session the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the pathophysiology of RA such that it might inform treatment mechanisms.
  • Describe professional guideline recommendations’ approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of RA and, where applicable, apply them to patient cases
  • Identify the currently available and emerging pharmacotherapeutic treatments for management of RA and apply them to patient cases using evidence-based medicine.
  • Evaluate a treatment plan for a specific patient with RA to optimize safety and efficacy, suggesting modifications for improvement, including the management of comorbidities.
  • Describe the challenges and barriers to care associated with treating patients with RA.

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